Author Archive

IMG_9858-1

Our project examined the role of mass media and the negative effects it has on our society. We explored the politics of consuming “bad” news vs “good” news. The purpose of the project was to remind people of relevant news topics and question the police state, government, and media through a pressure sensor from arduino!

Hackaball the game and ball that is going to shape and affect the minds of kids

Hackabll now allows younger kids to learn about coding and programming in fun, creative ways.As kids are creating projects like Hackaball, they’re learning to code, but even more importantly, they’re coding to learn. As they learn to code, it enables them to learn many other things, opens up many new opportunities for learning. It’s honestly the simplicity and instant gratification of combining these input and output possibilities that teach and engage children in new ways. Children will now look at new ways of bringing together the physical world and the virtual world and connecting to the world around us. There is a huge rise of companies marketing towards the younger generation such as LittleBits and Kano. And now specifically with Hackaball it can also speak “to a mounting desire for gadgets that don’t confine us to a desk and a screen. Whether you’re considering standing desks or Bret Victor’s speculations on user interfaces of the future, it’s clear that engaging with technology won’t always mean sitting down for hours on end.”

———————
Reading: Writing Code is like solving a rubick’s cube. Do you agree?

Yes, completely. “A programmer that appears to be making good progress can soon find that they will need to make changes which will have implications beyond the scope of the system they are currently working in. The task which on the surface seemed simple suddenly becomes more complex.” Just like the article stated, when you think you’ve finished one side of the rubiks cube you still have 5 other sides to finish, it’s this constant battle. When you think you’ve fixed one line of code you have to go back and alter the codes before it.

Research Exercise:

Interactive Piece 1 – Mi.Mu Gloves

A major premise of the David Roekby article was the degree in which the subject extends himself into their own piece, the article kept re-iterating how interactive works reflect with the interactors back to themselves and what I found so undeniably similar with this article and this video is that, Imogen Heap, being a performer is naturally invoking the idea of the mirror. Putting herself on stage, interacting with these gloves and mapping out her own program for herself to run though. Although the spectator isn’t actively involved in her piece she herself as the spectator is still maneuvering and interacting with the gloves designed by a group of MIT designers. She is gesturing, transforming sounds, and playing an active role in the systems language. There’s a translation to physical movements into a virtual one. Imogen Heap thus turns herself into the computer.

Interactive Piece 2 – Motion Senseing Robot Orhcestra

This is another clear examples of an interactive installations where the spectator’s body becomes apart of the computer-generated context. This piece follows the
movements of the interactor like a shadow, something that Roekby delves into about the spectator being a mirror to it’s interaction. There is this transformation made by the movements to the sounds of the robots and it’s amazing because literally the spectator becomes apart of the piece. The robots are taking in the information of movements and gestures and framing it into the recontextualizing it into some kind of futurist noise piece made by Luigi Russolo. It’s quiet amazing when you think about it, how we are taking from past concepts and generating and transforming new innovative ideas. What I find so interesting about this article is that Rokeby makes us think about the recontexualization of the mirror like image. THis piece is literally a gesturing image of the self that allows the body to explore its movements and interact with technology.

Mud Tub

Screen Shot 2015-02-10 at 4.09.40 AMhttp://tomgerhardt.com/mudtub/

 

“the Mud Tub frees the traditional computer interaction model of it’s rigidity, allowing humans to use their highly developed sense of touch, and creative thinking skills in a more natural way.”

The Mud Tub produces a tactile experiential language, where the user, like coding, is intimately creating various languages with ones own sense of touch. As Charles Petzold’s article, Code The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software, the natural language that the Mudtub is producing, corresponds to a different sense human beings produce and can respond to. New forms of communication  unearth, new patterns begin to develop, and a “natural” system begins to grow. There’s this strange parallel to the natural world vs. artificial, like morse code using the auditory sense to transmit a new language, the Mud tub uses ones own fingers and tactile sensations.

 

“The Mud Tub occupies a space similar to other experimental human-computer interfaces, like, multi-touch surfaces, body controllers, augmented reality systems, etc, which push the boundaries of codified interaction models, and drive the development of innovative software applications. Beyond its role as a research topic, the Mud Tub also exists as an open-sourced hardware/software platform on which interactive artists and designers explore new methods for creating and displaying their work.”

Assignment #1



void setup () {
  size(620, 600);
  noStroke (); 
  noFill ();



//Background 
background(214, 252, 255);

  //First interval is left to right
  //Second interval is up and down
  //Third interval sets width of shape
  //Fourth interval sets height of shape


//hair
   fill (47, 29, 13);
  ellipse (195, 180, 330, 415);
  rect (44, 239, 309, 144, 5);
  
  
 //face
      fill (239, 193, 140); 
  ellipse(195, 180, 270, 270);
   rect (153, 245, 75, 100);

  
        //eyes
         fill (82, 7, 7); 
         ellipse(125, 190, 25, 20);
         ellipse(255, 190, 25, 20);
         
          fill (255, 255, 255);
      ellipse (130, 190, 4, 4);
    ellipse (260, 190, 4, 4);
  
       //eyebrows
         fill (47, 29, 13);
         rect (100, 160, 55, 10, 5);
         rect (225, 160, 55, 10, 5);


  
//bangs
 fill (47, 29, 13);
  rect (70, 45, 250, 110, 7);

//body
  fill (239, 193, 140); 
  rect (40, 335, 320, 350, 70);
  
  
  
  
      //arms
      fill (211, 174, 131); 
      rect(90, 450, 5, 280, 7);
      rect(320, 455, 5, 280, 7);
      
   
     //nose
   //  fill (211, 174, 131, 84); 
//beginShape(TRIANGLES);
//vertex(180, 220);
//vertex(200, 175);
//vertex(210, 220);
//vertex(220, 175);
//   fill (211, 174, 131, 64);
//vertex(180, 230);
///vertex(200, 275);
//vertex(210, 230);
//vertex(220, 275);
  //  fill (211, 174, 131, 94);
//ellipse(190, 220, 15, 60);

//endShape();


      //mouth
      fill (217, 104, 113, 204); 
      arc(180, 270, 55, 55, 0, PI+QUARTER_PI, PIE);
      
      
      //boobies
      
     fill (179, 129, 72, 100);
     ellipse(265, 480, 80, 80);
     ellipse(150, 480, 80, 80);
      
      
        fill (218, 119, 142, 80);
     ellipse(265, 480, 40, 40);
     ellipse(150, 480, 40, 40);
     
      fill (249, 195, 131);
     ellipse(265, 480, 15, 10);
     ellipse(150, 480, 15, 10);
     
     
//beach towel, but lines arent working     
      //fill (102, 217, 186, 220);
      //rect (35, 455, 325, 350, 7);
   
   
   //dog
   fill (289, 207, 127);
   ellipse (495, 380, 185, 200);
    rect (450, 335, 220, 270, 70);
   
fill (183, 132, 43, 155);
   ellipse (425, 360, 55, 115);
   ellipse (555, 360, 55, 115);
   
   ellipse (490, 440, 85, 75);
   
   fill(0, 0, 0, 155);
    ellipse (490, 425, 55, 45);
   
   
   //dog eyes
   
    ellipse (465, 380, 35, 45);
    ellipse (505, 380, 35, 45);
   
   fill (0);
    ellipse (465, 382, 20, 20);
    ellipse (506, 382, 21, 21);
    
    fill (255, 255, 255);
      ellipse (465, 380, 5, 8);
    ellipse (505, 380, 5, 9);
   
    
    //feet
     fill (183, 132, 43, 155);
      rect(480, 550, 5, 80, 7);
      rect(505, 555, 5, 80, 7);
      rect(560, 555, 5, 80, 7);
    
    fill (248, 53, 67);
    bezier (95, 30, 50, 20, 70, 100, 25, 90);

 
    //shirt for myself
    
    fill (0, 0, 0, 220); 
  rect (90, 335, 240, 350, 70);
  
  //sleeves
  rect (40, 335, 115, 90, 10);
  rect (260, 335, 115, 90, 10);
    
    //pocket
    fill (255, 255, 255, 210);
    rect (225, 435, 55, 60, 10);
    
    //pen
    fill (102, 217, 186);
        rect (235, 435, 5, 14);
        
        fill (81, 152, 248);
        rect (235, 415, 5, 24);
        
          //neck
          fill (239, 193, 140); 
 
     ellipse(190, 373, 100, 120);
    
}