Author Archive

Birds on a Wire

Augmented projection project by Nicole Burns and Lauren Corlett

Lauren Corlett Interactive Art Research Exercise

David Rokeby in his article “Transforming Mirrors: Subjectivity and Control in Interactive Media” discusses both how user interaction changes an artwork over time, and how that interaction changes what it means to “create” interactive art.
Scott Snibbe’s “Cause and Effect” (2005) explores how user interaction shapes the artwork as much as the artwork shapes how the user interacts with it. In “Cause and Effect” a museumgoers silhouette is captured as they interact with the projected art piece. Viewers of the piece move “boxes” containing the captured silhouettes of others by allowing their own silhouette to collide with the boxes. The artwork then puts their silhouette into its own to be interacted with by another. In this way, users unknowingly become a part of the piece by with it. Just as Rokeby discusses in his article, Snibbe’s piece brings to light the “closed system of self-absorption” (Rokeby, 7) that interactive artwork often creates for the viewer in order to subvert it. The user tends to only see the work in terms of how they interacted with it, but in interacting with it, they themselves are added to the piece and interacted with by others. Instead of creating a one-person loop of interaction, the piece highlights the fact that it does not exist without the interaction of all of the viewers. However, if it can’t exist without the viewer’s interaction, did Snibbe really create it himself?
Stanza’s Touchscreen artworks (2004) also explore this question of ownership in interactive artwork. Stanza creates generative art pieces, displayed on a touchscreen, that respond according to mathematical behaviors as a user interacts with the touchscreen. The user can even switch between different “paintings” by selecting them from a pop-up list at the bottom of the screen. Each artwork has been individually coded by Stanza to contain different color palates, shapes, lines, and responses to user touch. However, it ultimately is the user who dictates what the piece looks like in the end. Rokeby describes the process of creating any artwork as continually choosing between an infinite set of possibilities presented to the creator at the start of the project. He says that the interactive artist “decides at some point in this process not to choose from among the remaining possibilities” (Rokeby, 2) instead, they let the audience make those final decisions for themselves, creating the artwork anew with each person who interacts with it. In this way, the spectator does become as much of a creator of the piece as the original artist.
Whether a museumgoer is unknowingly having their silhouette projected on a screen or actively changing an artwork by dragging their finger across a touchscreen, interactive art blurs the line between what it means to be an artist and what it means to be a spectator.

Lauren’s Generative Expressions Code

expressions.lauren

float col1;
float col2;
float col3;
float browy = 80;
float pupil = 6;
float cor1 = 178;
float cor1b = 161;
float cor2 = 148;
float cor2b = 220;


void setup() {
 size(402, 403);
}


 void draw() {
    if (mousePressed){
   //col1 = random(0,200);
   //col2 = random(0,50);
   //col3 = random(0,50);
   pupil= random(3,9);
   browy = random(70,90);
   cor1 = random(178, 190);
   cor2 = random(140, 160);
   cor1b =random(150, 172);
   cor2b =random(220, 230);
   
    }
   
   
   noStroke();

   
//chin
fill(243, 196, 182);
ellipse(208, 182, 37, 27);

//neck
fill(231, 186, 173);
rect(175, 150, 74, 71);


//face
fill(243, 196, 182);
ellipse(206, 123, 121, 152);

//arms
fill(255, 255, 255);
ellipse(97, 331, 88, 170);
ellipse(325, 316, 129, 187);


//shirt
fill(255, 255, 255);
quad(97, 231, 328, 223, 328, 403, 97, 403);


//shirthole
fill(231, 186, 173);
ellipse(219, 230, 94, 51);


//shadow
fill(221, 221, 221);
rect(87, 301, 16, 103);
rect(310, 292, 12, 120);


//hair2
fill(50, 31, 16);
noStroke();
ellipse(187, 44, 121, 51);


//nose2
fill(231, 186, 173);
quad(170, 98, 187, 94, 197, 127, 183, 134);


//hair
fill(50, 31, 16);
noStroke();
quad(127, 39, 177, 70, 161, 330, 80, 203);
quad(80, 203, 83, 309, 160, 304, 80, 203);
quad(192, 44, 243, 34, 281, 93, 251, 93);
quad(251, 93, 250, 342, 305, 299, 279, 89);


//ear
fill(243, 196, 182);
ellipse(257, 114, 28, 52);
//earlobe
fill(226, 177, 162);
ellipse(255, 114, 10, 23);

//eyebrow
strokeWeight(5);
stroke(50, 31, 16);
line(191, browy, 222, 79);

//eye
strokeWeight(pupil);
stroke(105, 72, 48);
fill(0,0,0);
ellipse(210, 96, 20, 11);

//nose
noStroke();
fill(231, 186, 173);
ellipse(191, 131, 28, 25);

//teeth
//noStroke();
//fill(255, 255, 255);
//quad(186, cor1b, cor2b, cor2, 214, 158, cor1, cor1b);

//smile
strokeWeight(6);
stroke(255, 42, 0);
line(cor1, cor1b, cor2b, cor2);
line(cor1, cor1b, 195, 172);
line(195, 172, 209, 169);
line(209, 169, cor2b, cor2);

 }

Fragmented Memory

The artwork “Fragmented Memory” by Phillip Stearns combines color, yarn, raw binary data, and Processing to create beautiful, technology-based textiles. Stearns’ use of a physical object to display inner workings of a computer explores the concept of where computers end and the physical world begins, much the way Casey Reas does in his attempt to translate Sol Lewitt’s Wall Drawings from a physical form to a computerized one.

Lauren Corlett Processing Portrait

size(402, 403);
noStroke();

//chin
fill(243, 196, 182);
ellipse(208, 182, 37, 27);

//neck
fill(231, 186, 173);
rect(175, 150, 74, 71);



//face
fill(243, 196, 182);
ellipse(206, 123, 121, 152);

//arms
fill(255, 255, 255);
ellipse(97, 331, 88, 170);
ellipse(325, 316, 129, 187);


//shirt
fill(255, 255, 255);
quad(97, 231, 328, 223, 328, 403, 97, 403);


//shirthole
fill(231, 186, 173);
ellipse(219, 230, 94, 51);



//shadow
fill(221, 221, 221);
rect(87, 301, 16, 103);
rect(310, 292, 12, 120);


//hair2
fill(50, 31, 16);
noStroke();
ellipse(187, 44, 121, 51);


//nose2
fill(231, 186, 173);
quad(170, 98, 187, 94, 197, 127, 183, 134);


//hair
fill(50, 31, 16);
noStroke();
quad(127, 39, 177, 70, 161, 330, 80, 203);
quad(80, 203, 83, 309, 160, 304, 80, 203);
quad(192, 44, 243, 34, 281, 93, 251, 93);
quad(251, 93, 250, 342, 305, 299, 279, 89);


//ear
fill(243, 196, 182);
ellipse(257, 114, 28, 52);
//earlobe
fill(226, 177, 162);
ellipse(255, 114, 10, 23);

//eyebrow
strokeWeight(6);
stroke(38, 10, 9);
line(191, 86, 222, 79);

//eye
strokeWeight(6);
stroke(105, 72, 48);
fill(0,0,0);
ellipse(210, 96, 20, 11);

//nose
noStroke();
fill(231, 186, 173);
ellipse(191, 131, 28, 25);

//teeth
noStroke();
fill(255, 255, 255);
quad(186, 160, 214, 150, 214, 158, 186, 168);

//smile
stroke(255, 42, 0);
line(178, 159, 220, 148);
line(178, 163, 195, 172);
line(195, 172, 209, 169);
line(209, 169, 225, 148);

portrait

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